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Sexual Health isn't the most comfortable topic to discuss.

Let's change that!

Our HEP team is here to help answer your questions,

no matter how awkward. 

have uncomfortable questions?

These are the people to ask!

Kurt Sterling

HEP Coordinator

Jennifer Guel

Health Education Specialist

Sam Higgs

Health Education Specialist

Ericka King

Health Navigation Specialist,
Bilingual

Health Education and Prevention (HEP)

connects you to the preventative care and health care you need.

Take responsibility for your health and your future.

Our OU Medical Clinic is always accessible via appointment with a judgment-free zone.
 

Sexual Health FAQ

Frequently asked questions

Does this service cost money?


No, this service does not cost money. You will not be charged for these services.




Do I need to have an id for service?


Clinics can ask you for an ID, but if you do not have an ID, you do not need one to receive these services. If you do have an ID, you can bring it with you to the appointment.




Is the appointment confidential?


Yes, the appointment is confidential. A confidential appointment means it will be private between only you and the health care provider.




Can I give this information to my friend?


Yes, you can give our information to a friend. We are able to help anyone between the ages of 13-24 in Tulsa and surrounding communities.




I have a question about my birth control, who can I call?


You can call the clinic or pharmacy where you received your birth control. You can also ask a health navigator on our staff. If they don’t know the answer to the question they can help you contact someone who can help you with the answer.




How do I refill my birth control?


You can get in touch with the clinic or pharmacy you received the birth control from. If you need help getting in touch with a clinic or don’t remember where you filled your birth control, you can contact one of our health navigators.




What is a Plan B?


Plan B is a brand name for an Emergency Contraceptive (EC), which is a medication that can be taken if a person has unprotected sex and would like to prevent an unplanned pregnancy. An emergency contraceptive works best if taken within 72 hours (3 days) after unprotected sex. The sooner it can be taken, the better chances it will work. If a person is already pregnant, the emergency contraceptive will not terminate (end) the pregnancy.




Do you help with Plan B and pregnancy testing?


If you are interested in emergency contraception (plan b) or pregnancy testing you can contact a health navigator and we can connect you to those services at no cost to you.




How long does it take to receive my results for STD testing?


Each clinic will vary. Most clinics take a 4-5 days to receive the test results and they will call you within a week. If a clinic does not call you after a week with tests results, you can call them and ask them for your test results.




How old do I have to be to buy condoms?


There are no age restrictions when it comes to purchasing condoms. If a person asks you how old you are, you do not have to answer. If a person tells you that you are not old enough or that you have to be a certain age, you can tell them that is not true and it is your right.




Where can I get condoms for free?


There are several resources for free condoms. Health departments and other family planning clinics are great sources for free condoms. Social service agencies, like Youth Services of Tulsa, can also be resources for free condoms. In schools, your school nurse or counselors may be a good resource to help you connect with free condom resources in your community.




What is consent?


Consent is asking and receiving permission for anything as long as it is safe, healthy, and wanted by all those involved. An important part of consent is making sure that all partners are on the same page when it comes to defining physical activities like “making out” or “hooking up”. It can be a good idea to define these and other physical activities before they happen to avoid confusion and misunderstandings.




What does consent look like?


Consent is a clear and enthusiastic “yes!” every step of the way. All partners should keep giving and looking for consent. It is important to consider physical and nonverbal cues as well. If someone seems unsure, stays silent, freezes, does not respond, or says “maybe”, then they are not giving consent. It is important to note that just because a person did not say “no”, it does not mean they have given consent. If a partner seems uncomfortable, stop and talk about it.





311 S Madison Ave, Tulsa, OK 74120 | ​Tel: 918.582.0061​ | youthservices@yst.org

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